Saving Energy

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In 2015, stationary refrigeration, air-conditioning and heat pumps accounted for about 17% of global electricity demand.[1]

The need for increasingly efficient appliances will rise as demand from developing countries escalates. A recent study suggested that improved energy efficiency has the potential to double the climate mitigation potential of the HFC phase down.[2]

Energy savings from natural refrigerants and not-in-kind technologies continue to improve beyond expectations. Examples of rapid progress can be found in the commercial refrigeration sector where natural refrigerant technologies now outperform HFC-based alternatives, even in warmer climates.

The biggest overall energy savings will come from the air-conditioning sector, which is often the greatest source of electricity demand in warm climates. Increasing urbanisation, rising incomes and falling air conditioner prices in many developing economies mean that by 2030 an additional 700 million units will be added to the global air-conditioner stock. [3]

The Cool Technologies database shows that natural refrigerants such as propane (R-290) can meet the majority of air-conditioning needs, especially in hot climates.

 


[1] TEAP (2017) TEAP DECISION XXVIII/3 WORKING GROUP REPORT ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY OCTOBER 2017  downloaded at http://conf.montreal-protocol.org/meeting/mop/cop11-mop29/presession/Background-Documents/TEAP-EEWG-Report-october2017.pdf

[2] Nihar Shah et al. (2015) Benefits of Leapfrogging to Superefficiency and Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants in Room Air Conditioning https://eta.lbl.gov/sites/default/files/publications/lbnl-1003671.pdf

[3] Nihar Shah et al. (2015) Benefits of Leapfrogging to Superefficiency and Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants in Room Air Conditioning https://eta.lbl.gov/sites/default/files/publications/lbnl-1003671.pdf

 

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The need for increasingly efficient appliances will rise as demand from developing countries escalates. A recent study suggested that improved energy efficiency has the potential to double the climate mitigation potential of the HFC phase down.[2]

Energy savings from natural refrigerants and not-in-kind technologies continue to improve beyond expectations." data-share-imageurl="">